Video Recording: a great way to reach out to remote learners

Video Recording: a great way to reach out to remote learners

As teachers, the COVID-19 crisis has forced a great many changes in the way we do our jobs. Not all of these have been easy or comfortable. Personally, I’ve had to transition from blended learning to being completely online. Although my classes have always featured a lot of online tasks and activities, the change has brought significant challenges. Truth be told, it’s been exhausting.

With all the effort of preparing my online lessons, it was only recently that I found the time to wonder how the learners were being affected by all of this? For students whom I’ve never met face-to-face, it’s hard to know. However, I was able to reach out to some of my former students who are still studying to ask them how they’re making out. Read More »

Voice Shadowing: What is it, and can it help you to learn a language?

Voice Shadowing: What is it, and can it help you to learn a language?

Voice shadowing is a language learning technique in which a learner listens to a recording of native speech and repeats the words aloud along with the speaker. The requirements for voice shadowing are simple. All that students need are a pair of headphones and a level-appropriate audio recording in the target language.

Choosing the Right Recording

The length, speed, and complexity of the text are all factors to consider when choosing a recording. At lower levels of proficiency, it can be difficult to find something appropriate, and it is often better (and easier) for teachers to make the recordings themselves. In years gone by, teachers supplied their learners with cassette tapes or CDs, but these days it is much easier to record and distribute audio to students online using a free service such as Record MP3 Online Read More »

Is there more to language teaching than “just talking”?

Is there more to language teaching than “just talking”?

I was recently speaking to a Korean friend of mine about how things have changed for him since COVID-19. As you can imagine, there was a long list of differences. Toward the end of it, he mentioned that his children were now getting their English lessons online. As someone intimately acquainted with online language teaching, my ears perked up. 

“How’s that going?” I asked.

“Terrible!” I probed him for details. ‘All they do is talk,” he said. “The whole time. Nothing else. No teaching.” 

I asked if it was important for his children to be able to speak English. “Of course,” he said. “Most important. But they need teaching. The talking they’re doing in the lesson is…” He trailed off. “It’s like friends.”

The expectations people have of teachers differs vastly from place to place, and there was definitely a cultural dimension to his argument, but I found myself wondering if he had a point. A lot of what goes on in online language lessons more closely resembles socializing than traditional teaching.  Read More »