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How to play Quizlet Live in Zoom

How to play Quizlet Live in Zoom

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past 10 years, you’ve probably heard of (and used) Quizlet. For the few who haven’t, Quizlet is an online flashcard system that allows users to create sets of terms and definitions as well as study those created by others. There are five study modes: Learn, Flashcards, Write, Spell (desktop only), and Test. There are also three game modes: Match, Gravity (desktop only), and Live. It is the last of these games that I would like to introduce in this post. More specifically, I would like to introduce a couple of alternatives that allow students to play over a video conferencing platform such as Zoom.

Before I delve into the details of how to set things up, I should first explain the basic objectives of Quizlet Live. Live is a quiz game played in teams. Each team is presented with a series of questions which they must answer correctly to advance. The first team to answer 12 consecutive questions correctly wins. Incorrect answers incur a three-second penalty and the team loses all of its points.  Read More »

5 Ideas for interactive language learning tasks in Zoom

5 Ideas for interactive language learning tasks in Zoom

Whether you’re teaching online by choice or because it’s no longer possible to meet your students face-to-face, you’ve probably been spending a lot of time thinking up ways to keep your lessons fun and interactive. While it’s true that online teaching comes with plenty of constraints, there are also opportunities for adaptation and experimentation. Some of the things you try will have disappointing results, but others will hit the mark and become staples of your lessons for months and years to come. 

The list that follows may be short right now, but I’m confident that it will continue to grow as I learn from others and continue experimenting with the new technology. Read More »

Why should language learners read aloud?

Why should language learners read aloud?

How often in your daily life do you read aloud? Unless you have small children, the answer is probably “not often”. For most of us, the vast majority of the oral reading we did was back in the early years of elementary school, when we were still learning to read. At that stage, it was important to read aloud in order for teachers to grasp our strengths and deficits as developing readers. With this information, they could provide the assistance needed to address the issues preventing fluent reading.

As we grow older, and the mechanics of reading are presumed to have been mastered, reading is assessed through comprehension. We read a passage, and then answer questions to demonstrate that we have read well. Assessing comprehension can alert teachers to reading problems, but it cannot shed much light on the nature of the problems. In other words, while teachers might know that their students are not reading well, with only comprehension scores to go on, they are none the wiser as to why. Read More »